Kevin Warrington

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Vagrant

Vagrant is used to create and configure lightweight, reproducible, and portable (Linux, Mac OS X or Windows) development environments

Setup

A Vagrantfile is used to describe your project’s environment, specifically:

  1. root directory
  2. box or machine type, allocated resources and how it is accessed
  3. software installed

Software installation can be deferred to provisioning tools such as shell scripts, Chef, or Puppet.

To create a new Vagrantfile, run:

vagrant init

Boxes

Vagrant uses as a box (base image) to clone a virtual machine.

So, the first step is to add a box from the Vagrant Cloud:

vagrant box add chef/ubuntu-13.10

Inside your Vagrantfile, reference this box:

Vagrant.configure("2") do |config|
    config.vm.box = "chef/ubuntu-13.10"
end

Verify

vagrant up
vagrant ssh

Provisioning

Vagrant has built in provisioning via the shell provisioner.

First create a public directory to house our web files:

mkdir public
echo "HI" > public/index.html

Simply create a bootstrap.sh file at the root of our project:

#!/usr/bin/env bash

apt-get update
apt-get install -y apache2
rm -rf /var/www
ln -fs /vagrant/public /var/www

Add this script reference to our Vagrantfile:

Vagrant.configure("2") do |config|
    config.vm.provision :shell, :path => "bootstrap.sh"
end

Then reload and run the provisoner

vagrant reload --provision

Verify

vagrant ssh
wget -qO- 127.0.0.1

Networking

Vagrant supports port forwarding, public and private networks

To setup port forwarding for our apache server simply:

Vagrant.configure("2") do |config|
    config.vm.network :forwarded_port, host: 4567, guest: 80
end

Then reload

vagrant reload

Verify

http://localhost:4567

Teardown

Vagrant supports a number of teardown options:

  • Suspend saves VM RAM and contents to disk, fast boot
  • Halt saves VM contents to disk, cold boot
  • Destroy removes VM from disk

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